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I have talked about how to introduce a picture book by reading the title of the book and looking at the pictures on the cover.  This is an important skill for children to learn, since readers use the title and the pictures on the front cover to maintain interest in the book and predict words that may be in the book.

Today, I will talk about how to respond with specific feedback when your children make a prediction.  You want to make your children aware that they have made a good response and reinforce the use of the title and the pictures as proof of use of evidence in their responses.  The feedback you give should refer to the part of the title and/or cover pictures your children used when making predictions.

I will use two other books that I love to use in my classroom, Dragons Love Tacos and The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog.

 

Dragons Love Tacos

Dragons Love Tacos

Let’s take a look at the title and cover of Dragons Love Tacos.

Your children may say, “I think that the dragon was very hungry and she wanted to eat her favorite food.  She made a lot of tacos with tomatoes, lettuce, and beans.  Then, she ate them all.”

To reinforce use of the title when making predictions, you could say, “That is a good prediction. You said that the dragon was hungry and wanted to eat her favorite food.  You guessed that Tacos were her favorite food, because the title is Dragons Love Tacos.  A food she loves has to be one of her favorite foods.”

To reinforce the use of the picture when making predictions, you could say, “What a great prediction!  You looked at the picture and saw that there were a lot of tacos.  You knew that they had come from somewhere, so you said that she made them.  You looked at the picture very closely.  You saw that the tacos were filled with food that was red, green, and brown, so you guessed that they were tomatoes, lettuce, and beans.”

The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog

Great Gracie ChaseNext, let’s look at The Great Gracie Chase: Stop That Dog.

Your children may say, “I think that the dog is named Gracie and she is being chased by the people. They want her to stop, because she took something that they want.  Gracie does not look tired, so I think that she will keep running.”

To support the use of the title when making predictions, you may say, “You thought a lot about that prediction.  I notice that you used part of the title to help you.  The title said that it was a Gracie Chase and that they wanted to stop that dog.  You said that Gracie is being followed by people and that they wanted her to stop to get something.”

To support the use of the cover picture when making predictions, you may say, “That prediction was good.  You saw that the dog was being chased by a lot of people and that Gracie looks like she is full of energy.  You guessed that she will continue to run from the people, since she is not tired.”

Tips

 

  • You may want to mention either the title or the pictures separately in your feedback when you are first teaching this to your children. Once your children can use one of these consistently, they may be able to use that skill as an anchor to learn to use the other and to eventually use both sources to make predictions.
  • You may want to mention both the title and the picture in your responses after your children have mastered the use of each one individually.
  • There are not perfect responses to your children’s predictions. Just try your best.  Your children will just enjoy reading with you.